Tag Archives: beacon hill

Blanketed in Snow


Last Sunday, Boston was blanketed in snow. Despite frigid temps and a bit of wind, people were out enjoying the day, yours truly included.

Autumnal Images

The first four images were made last week on Beacon Hill. Some homes skipped the Halloween theme in lieu of fall plants and gourds. The last image, ‘Shroom, was from a hike in the woods near home last month. It’s getting chillier here and most nights we have the woodstove going. We’ve cleaned up the front of the house so it looks fine from the street, but the backyard needs to be raked and such. It’s great to have some things this time of year to still get us outside and enjoying the crisp fresh air. Cheers

Beacon Hill Halloween

The people living on Beacon Hill, you have very little space to “strut their stuff” for the holidays. But these folks are creative. From window boxes, to balconies, to Louisburg Square, they found ways to decorate and have fun. I just wish I could go in Monday night and trick-or-treat.

Beacon Hill Window Boxes


A selection of window boxes from Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood

Beacon Hill: Small Details


This series of entries focuses on a photographic tour of my hometown of Boston, Massachusetts that I took with PhotoWalks in order to challenge my ability to make more compelling images.

While walking through Boston’s Beacon Hill neighborhood, we focused not just on the architecture of the various buildings, but also all the little tiny details. Saba, our guide, knew many such details that most of us would just stroll past. It would have been so easy to miss the tiny red door that is actually the main entrance to a basement apartment. (She also had the idea of framing the red door with the yellow fire hydrant in the foreground.) Each doorstep or window seemed to hold treasures. The area’s gas lights are a symbol of the neighborhood. Interesting railings or door knockers were prime targets for photographs.

Lesson learned: Don’t be in a rush to go from one building to the next. Slow down enough and look for the small details.

For those of you planning to visit Boston and are interested in going out with PhotoWalks, please go to http://www.photowalks.com.

Cheers!

Beacon Hill – The Big Picture


I’ve been focusing my entries on a photographic tour of my hometown of Boston, Massachusetts that I took with PhotoWalks in order to challenge my ability to make more compelling images.

Strolling through Beacon Hill, the Federal-style architecture is really striking. Last fall, I made some images there but found them a bit bland. Saba, our guide, found ways to make them more interesting. In the shot of the gold-domed State House, we used foliage to frame the shot a bit. In many of our images, we used angles that captured the gas lamps in the shots in creative ways. On Joy Street, she suggested tilting the camera a bit to make it more interesting. Then, she also saw a truck with a black hood and thought to use this as a mirror to shoot the reflections of the buildings. We also looked for buildings that had unique features, such as Number 24 Pinkney Street in which no two windows are the same.

Lesson learned: Don’t shoot architecture only straight on or from a 45 degree side angle. Use other angles, tilt your camera, or shoot low and up on some shots. Try framing or using interesting reflections. Crop the cars out of your shots. Incorporate interesting details, like the gas lamps or flags. Be creative.

For those of you planning to visit Boston and are interested in going out with PhotoWalks, please go to http://www.photowalks.com.

Cheers!

Monochrome Monday – Fire Escape

Pinkney Street - Fire Escape
As I said yesterday, I went on a photographic tour of my hometown of Boston, Ma with PhotoWalks to challenge my ability to make more compelling images.

As we strolled through Beacon Hill, Saba, our guide, seemed to know or be willing to talk to anyone there. As we passed by one apartment under construction, the door to the alley was open. She poked her head inside and began chatting up the workmen. She asked about what they were working on and how the buildings were laid out and such. And then she asked if we could have a peak in the courtyard. They let us come up to the space behind the buildings on Beacon Hill. You can see in the image how they are all connected and linked. The lines and angles made a wonderful image.

Lesson learned: Talk to people and be curious while making images. It can literally open doors for your photography.

Cheers

Beacon Hill

It recently occurred to me that Beacon Hill in Boston is such a beautiful area and yet I never go there to make photos. While visiting Boston last Friday, I took a walk through the area with my camera. Being the day after Thanksgiving, there was a mix of both fall and Christmas decorations. Some doorways were decorated with pumpkins while others had Christmas wreaths hanging from them.