Albany Bridge – Albany, NH

The first bridge on this site was constructed in 1857 and was destroyed by a windstorm the next year. The builders, Amzi Russell and Leandre Morton, then contracted with the town to build a new bridge for $1,300 minus the amount they were previously paid for the original bridge.

An interpretive sign next to the bridge explains that covered bridges were built by judgment rather than exact engineering design. The builders tried to make them large enough in both height and width for a farm wagon filled with hay to pass.

This bridge has its own parking lot because it’s located adjacent to a popular parkway in White Mountain National Forest. Visitors can park and explore the river and the bridge.

A common problem with these old wooden bridges is that they will float away if the river rises sufficiently during floods.  I noticed this set of connecting metal rods at either end of the bridge on the upstream side. They were clearly designed to anchor the bridge so that if the river does flood and lift the bridge, it can’t carry it off.

Because the bridge serves both the town and the tourists visiting White Mountain National Forest, the town and U.S. Forest Service have collaborated on its maintenance.

30 thoughts on “Albany Bridge – Albany, NH

  1. michnavs

    I am in awe when you said “covered bridges were built by judgment rather than exact engineering design”…that’s amazing.

    Your shot of the connecting metal rods speak to me…i could write a poem on that..

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      There is definitely a metaphor in those rods. That’s what drew me to make the image. If you’d like to write something on it, you could use the images for a post. Have a great day.

      Reply
      1. michnavs

        I actually went on your about page and i read that the photos can be used as long as we ask permission..i will email you as.soon as i finish writing..thank you so much

  2. China Dream

    Some of our bridges are for viewing, crossing on foot, etc. vehicle traffic is rerouted. Was it you who told us that there was one being used as a picnic area /or small cafe? cheers! I’m off to Montreal today..

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      I’ve shown one with a picnic table inside and the next one that I’ll show had three picnic tables inside. Montreal?! That’s where we want to go when the pandemic ends. Have fun.

      Reply
  3. Liz Gauffreau

    The connecting rods photo spoke metaphically to me as well. I love how you composed the photo. I also really like the light in the first photo. It looks as though it’s streaming from the yellow tree.

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you. Yes, I like the first shot also. I do a lot of shots of the full bridge but the light on this one was really quite good. The connecting rods were a cool find. They were something I almost missed and then saw them as I was preparing to leave.

      Reply
  4. loisajay

    “…built by judgment rather than exact engineering design.” I love that. That is how I bake–who has time for exact measurement? I like to eyeball things and move on. Bridges and banana bread–who knew making them was so similar? 😀

    Reply
  5. Sandra

    These are beautiful perspectives Chris! I love the way you composed the shot of the metal anchors. The lighting is always the best in your shots. Nice work! I hope you’re having a great Sunday!

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you. I tried to arrive early and this was the first of the bridges I photographed that day so it had the best light. It’s quiet but nice here. I hope you and your family are also having a good day.

      Reply
  6. Nancy

    Well done Chris! The interior architecture of the curved wood is gorgeous!
    This one was a beauty and you captured all the elements nicely!
    Happy Sunday to you!

    Reply
  7. Footprints

    The curved wood inside is beautiful! I love how much light comes through. The anchors made me think of the anchors in our lives that help us stay grounded through the storms we face in life.

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you. Several people have commented on the anchors and how they are a metaphor for life. The curves are interesting. They are actually several boards laminated together.

      Reply

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