Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

This is the fourth and final bridge in Cornish, NH, the Cornish-Windsor Bridge. It crosses the Connecticut River between Cornish, New Hampshire and Windsor, Vermont. It is 449 feet long, making it the longest wooden covered bridge in the United States and the longest two-span covered bridge in the world.

This bridge was built by James Tasker and Bela Fletcher in 1866 for $9,000. Like the Dingleton Hill Bridge, it was framed on land and then moved to this location. For a time in the 1930s and 40s, it was operated as a toll bridge.

Itโ€™s had several restorations over the years, the most significant being a reconstruction in 1989 at a cost of 4.45 million dollars.   Iโ€™ve photographed this bridge on a few different occasions and these are photos from various visits. 

bridge, covered bridge, nh, new hampshire, cornish, cornish-windsor

39 thoughts on “Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

  1. Suzette Benjamin

    Wonderful post, It is eye opening how value has changed — the cost of the bridge’s initial construction versus that of its modern day repairs is an eye opening revelation on money’s “value.” Great work. Thank you!

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you. It is amazing. There is anotehr bridge coming up in the next week that is a modern covered bridge meant to carry modern loads. The cost was also in the millions. And it’s huge.

      Reply
      1. Suzette Benjamin

        Wonderful! I will look out for your posts. I am enjoying your series immensely. Thank you for all the work it takes to produce and post those treasures to be enjoyed. Cheers

      2. milfordstreet Post author

        Thank you. I’m glad you are enjoying the series. I have fun going on the outings to take the pics. They make for a good socially distanced day trip.

  2. michnavs

    Now you have keep me looking for covered bridges too nearby or even in my country…but google says…nahh we don’t have…those are interesting structures..i adore the last photo..

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you. I think different areas have different styles. Ours just happens to be covvered bridges. I have a friend in Spain where they have amazing ancient bridges and Roman aquaducts. What is your country known for architecturally?

      Reply
      1. michnavs

        I am from a country that has been under several foriegn colonizations.for over a hundred years we were colobized by the Spaniards, then by the Japanese and Americans..so our culture along with its architectures are mostly influenced by these three countries. My own home even is a Spanish inspired house.

  3. loisajay

    Mr Tasker had quite the fascination with bridges–and was wonderful at it, too! This was a bit pricier than his other bridges. Still lovely, though.

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you, Hannah. It is a cool bridge. It’s pretty amazing to think it was built on land and then brought to the river. And they did this with animals rather than machines. It’s mind blowing.

      Reply
  4. Sandra

    Wow Chris! I love the picture showing the expanse of the bridge and the sign about the fine for ignoring the warning. This one was a little pricey compared to other bridge projects weโ€™ve seen in this great collection! Beautiful images. I hope youโ€™re doing well! Take care

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you, Sandra. The price of bridges, Like everything else, has gone up. ๐Ÿ˜‚ This is a cool bridge. I drove over it to visit the sculpture garden in Vermont that I showed a week or two ago. Itโ€™s like driving through a tunnel. You take care too. ๐Ÿ˜Š

      Reply
  5. Nancy

    Wow! Love this bridge! And to think they built it elsewhere and brought it here. And how about that $2 fine!!
    I have loved your series on covered bridges. Thank you for taking the time to share them all with us.
    Hope all is good. Have a lovely evening… Chris.

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Thank you, Nancy. I’m glad you’re enjoying the series. We still have a lot of bridges to go. I haven’t really even started all the ones in the White Mountains and further north. Have a great evening.

      Reply
  6. aratibanstola

    Beautiful pictures! ๐Ÿ˜And your posts about bridges have definitely made me see the beauty in them as well. I’ve never looked bridges so carefully, but would definitely perceive the ones around here by now. Take care.๐Ÿ˜Š

    Reply
      1. aratibanstola

        Hmm..I really don’t have much idea about the bridges of those kind, but we really have a lot of suspension bridges here; which I used to find so scary early in my life.๐Ÿ˜…

  7. Sarah

    For a short second I thought you’ve been to England (Windsor)! ๐Ÿ˜ That bridge looks really long! And wow! Built on land and then moved to its side, I’d have loved to watch that! ๐Ÿ˜€

    Reply
  8. Sheryl's Light

    Hello, I came across your blog noticing the beautiful covered bridge which I absolutely adore. Back in those days, $9000 probably seemed like a lot of money, today, not so much. Thanks for sharing one of my favorite subjects. We also have covered here in Vermont.

    Reply
    1. milfordstreet Post author

      Hello. Thank you for your comment. Yes, your state also has its share of covered bridges. And we share the Cornish-Windsor bridge. Itโ€™s interesting to see the cost of these bridges go from a couple hundred dollars to millions. Im glad you enjoyed the posts.

      Reply

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